Wellbeing FAQs

Q

“I feel sad all the time and I struggle to get out of bed for lectures, what’s happening to me...?”

A

It could be that you are going through a period of adjustment to university life and with time and some lifestyle changes things will revert back to how you were before coming to uni. OR It could be that you are experiencing a depressive episode, there would be other symptoms to suggest this may be the problem. It would be best to talk to someone about how you are feeling, the wellbeing worker, a counsellor, your GP or tutor or sympathetic friends and family.

Q

“My housemate is acting really weird lately she has changed a lot over the past few weeks, she is really suspicious and gets really angry when I ask her what’s the matter. I don’t know what to do for the best?”

A

It may be that your friend is experiencing severe stress and reacting in this way, try to talk to her, tell you are worried about her and want to help. She may be using drugs and this may be causing her change in behaviour. If people are very suspicious it is called paranoia and if this is the problem she really needs to see the wellbeing worker or GP. If her behaviour has changed significantly she may be developing a psychosis, again this is a serious illness and again she needs to see the wellbeing worker or GP.  If she won’t talk about her troubles then maybe leave a leaflet about the counselling & wellbeing service around or put one up on your flat notice board. Talk to someone about your worries for her health, maybe a tutor or the wellbeing worker.

Q

“My flatmate has cut marks on his arms, they are not on display or anything but I noticed one time when he had a shower. What shall I do?”

A

Self harming behaviour often worries people who see marks/cuts on arms or legs. The majority of people use it as a coping mechanism and it is predominantly a very private act. If your flat mate wishes to talk about it he will raise it with you.

Q

“I can’t sleep anymore, my heart is racing and I feel like I am going to have a heart attack, I feel sick, I feel like I am going mad. What’s the matter with me?”

A

It sounds like you are experiencing anxiety and panic attacks. It is important to talk to someone about this as it will help reduce your symptoms and explain what is happening in your body. It would be best to talk to someone about how you are feeling, such as the wellbeing worker or a counsellor, your GP, personal  tutor or sympathetic friends and family members.

Q

“My flatmate is taking lots of drugs and drinking heavily, she is not attending lectures and has taken a couple of overdoses. She is always saying she wants to die but won’t go anywhere about it. I am really frightened she will kill herself.”

A

This student is in a serious crisis and needs to be seen as soon as possible, she sounds desperate to talk to someone about how she is feeling but she doesn’t know how to do it. Suggest that she come and see the well being or counselling workers but if she will not; then talk to the staff in the halls about your worries for your friend.

Q

“If I get ill when I am in Liverpool what shall I do as my GP is at home?

A

It is essential that every student registers with a local GP and Dentist as soon as they arrive in Liverpool as this will give you access to the local health resources. It is possible to be registered dually in Liverpool and remain with your home GP.   It is not advisable or appropriate to wait until you are ill.  Registering with a local doctor is very important and nobody else will do it for you. You can find a G.P. in your area by logging on to http://www.nhsdirect.co.uk/ , by ringing 0845 46 47, or by viewing the Student Medical Services website.

Q

“My doctor gave me a prescription for a course of pills but I can’t afford to pay for them. What shall I do?

A

As a student you may be entitled to full or partial exemption (on the grounds of low income) from prescription, dental and optical charges. With prescriptions you will either qualify for full exemption or no exemption. To claim exemption, complete a HC1 application, which is available from Student Welfare Services, GP or dentist surgery. In an emergency, please remember that GPs and casualty departments are unable to do dental work. If you are not registered with a dentist, in an emergency call Liverpool Dental Hospital on 0151 706 5000 or the NHS Direct on 0845 46 47.

If you have already paid for treatment, it is possible to claim a refund within 3 months with form HC5, which is also available from Student Welfare Services. If you regularly have to pay prescription charges (i.e. for more than 5 prescriptions in 4 months) it will be more cost effective to use a pre-payment certificate.

Q

“I am currently supported by the early intervention service (EIS) in my local area, what will happen when I start university?”

A

Don’t worry your care will be transferred to the Liverpool EIS team, the wellbeing works closely with the team so the transfer will go smoothly. In the first instance make an appointment with the wellbeing worker to discuss the arrangements for the transfer.

Q

“I am an overseas student with emotional problems am I able to access services?”

The wellbeing worker and LJMU services offer culturally appropriate services, it is best to make contact and discuss your needs with the counselling and wellbeing service.

Q

“I feel bad about myself, I feel fat and ugly. I feel guilty when I eat and I keep vomiting and using laxatives. I am very unhappy.”

A

It sounds like you may be developing an eating disorder possibly bulimia and you should seek some help to talk about how you are feeling, contact the wellbeing worker, counsellor or make an appointment to speak to your GP.

Q

“My boyfriend keeps trying to persuade me to take a legal high powder when we go out clubbing, he says it can’t do any harm and can’t be bad for you as it’s legal, so it’s not like other drugs.”

Recent research on so called “legal highs” has indicated that in certain circumstances they can be highly addictive and the short and long term effects are uncertain. Any substance such as alcohol , legal or illegal drugs have an impact on your mental health by creating euphoric, hallucinogenic or amphetamine type physical and psychological responses depending on the substance you take. The impact on individuals will vary and it is impossible to identify who may have a negative and possible long standing impact on their health.



Page last modified 17 May 2010.

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